CURRICULUM VITAE
Evan M. Selinger

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Philosophy of Technology, Philosophy of Law, Applied Ethics, and Phenomenology.

AREAS OF COMPETENCE
Philosophy of mind (emphasis on embodied cognition), Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Education, and 20th Century Continental

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS (after graduate school)
Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, Fall 2015-Present
Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, Fall 2009-Present
Head of Research Communications, Community & Ethics, Center for Media for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction, Creativity (MAGIC), Fall 2013- Present
Graduate Program Faculty, Golisano Institute for Sustainability (RIT), Winter 2009-Spring 2014
Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, Fall 2003-Spring 2009

Academic Appointments (during graduate school)
Instructor, Stony Brook University, Fall 1998-Spring 2003
Instructor, Hofstra University, Fall 2000-Summer 2002
Instructor, Dowling College, Fall 1998-Spring 2000

VISITING AFFILIATIONS
Senior Fellow, Future of Privacy Forum, 2015-Present.
Fellow, Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology 2012-2016.
Research Associate, Center for Philosophy of Technology and Engineering Science, Twente University, Netherlands (2010-2012)
Visiting Scholar, Department of Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University, 2009-2010 (sabbatical year)
Visiting Professor, Danish Research School in Philosophy, History of Ideas, and History of Science, Roskilde University, Denmark, 2007
Visiting Professor, Center for Philosophy of Technology and Engineering Science, University of Twente, Netherlands, 2007

EDUCATION
Ph.D. in Philosophy, Stony Brook University, 2003
Dissertation, with Don Ihde as Director: “On Expertise: Descriptive and Normative Problems”
M.A. in Philosophy, distinction on comprehensive exam, The University of Memphis, 1998
B.A. in Philosophy, highest honors on thesis, Binghamton University, 1996

AWARDS AND GRANTS

  • Teaching Fellowship, Philosophy Department, University of Memphis, 1996-1998
  • Teaching Fellowship, Philosophy Department, Stony Brook University, 1998-2002
  • President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, Stony Brook University, 2001
  • Mildred and Herbert Weisinger Dissertation Fellowship, Stony Brook University, 2002
  • Morris Cohen Teaching Award, Stony Brook University, 2002
  • Curriculum Development Award for Collaborative Teaching, Stony Brook University, 2002
  • Teaching Fellowship. Learning Communities. Stony Brook University, 2002
  • Graduate Council Commendation to Distinguished Doctoral Students, Stony Brook University, 2003
  • Internal RIT funding from multiple departments and administrators to co-direct the conference, “Rethinking Theories and Practices of Imagining: Technology, Representation, and the Disciplines,” 2004, (approximately $7,000)
  • College of Liberal Arts Grants for Research and Faculty Development, RIT, 2004-2008 (9 awards, 2 collaborative, total: $17, 681.45)
  • Paul and Francena Miller Faculty Fellowship, RIT, 2007, ($12,000)
  • Northern Illinois University Interdisciplinary Healthcare ManagementGrant, 2009, ($30,000)
  • Internal RIT funding from multiple departments and administrators, plus support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to co-direct the conference, “Sustainability Ethics,” 2009, (approximately $10,000)
  • Humanities/Science-Technology Cluster Grant (A Mellon Foundation Funded Consortium) to organize a workshop on translational research in medicine (with Theodore Brown), 2009, ($32,000)
  • Co-PI on National Science Foundation project # 1037236, “An Experiential Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics” (with PI Tom Seager and co-PI Braden Allenby), 2009-2012, ($399, 926)
  • Overhead Funding for University Growth, sustainability ethics project, RIT, (with Tom Seager and David Schwartz), 2009,  ($22,000)
  • Co-PI on National Science Foundation Project # 1024477, “Workshop Support: Acquiring and Using Interactional Expertise: Psychological, Sociological, and Philosophical Perspectives” (with co-PIs Greg Feist and David Stone), 2010, ($30,000)
  • PI on National Science Foundation REU Supplement for “An Experiential Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics,” 2011, ($6,000)

Monographs

1. Being Human in the 21st Century. Co-authored with Brett Frischmann. Cambridge University Press. Under contract with 2017 delivery date.

2. Expertise: Philosophical Reflections. Automatic/VIP Press (2011). 205 pages.

Expertise: Philosophical Reflections is a compelling and illuminative analysis of one of the most crucial issues in our technological culture. Deftly moving between philosophy of technology, ethics, political philosophy and philosophy of science, the book unravels the phenomenon of expertise in all its facets and dimensions. Like no other, Selinger is able to combine philosophical rigor and depth with social engagement and relevance. This study is a must-read for everybody who wants to understand and improve the role of experts, and our trust in them, in contemporary society.”—Peter-Paul Verbeek

“Expertise today has become both highly important and controversial–Luddite politics, science skepticism, climate doubters complicate the scene.  Evan Selinger takes a deep and probing look at styles of expertise, including acquisition of skill expertise with Hubert Dreyfus and interactive expertise with Harry Collins, and Paul Feyerabend’s skeptical role. He adds his own empirical turn examples to give us all much needed insight into expertise in the 21st century.”Don Ihde

*Stephen Turner edited a book symposium on the text for Philosophy and Technology 26, 1 (2013): 93-109. Heather Douglas and William Rheg were the respondents. In turn, I replied to their commentaries.

Edited Books

1. Chasing Technoscience: Matrix for Materiality (co-edited with Don Ihde). Indiana University PressL 2003. [Chapters by Don Ihde, Bruno Latour, Donna Haraway, Andy Pickering, Casper Bruun Jensen, and myself.]

(*) Reviews appear in: Philosophy of Science, This Year’s Work in Critical and Cultural Theory, Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, and Human Studies.

2. Postphenomenology: A Critical Companion to Ihde. SUNY Press: 2006. [Chapters by Vivian Sobchack, Carl Mitcham, Lenore Langsdord, Trevor Pinch, Judith Lochhead, Paul Thompson, Peter-Paul Verbeek, Robert Scharff, Richard Cohen, Peter Galison, Donna Haraway, Andrew Feenberg, Donn Welton, Andrew Pickering, Robert Crease, Finn Olesen, Albert Borgmann, Hans Lenk, Don Ihde, and myself.]

(*) Reviews appear in: Janus Head, Metascience, International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Human Studies, Philosophy and Social Criticism, Symploke, Review of Metaphysics, Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, and Argumentos De Razón Técnica.  The 2007 meeting of the Society for the Philosophy of Technology featured a panel on the book.

3. The Philosophy of Expertise (co-edited with Robert Crease). Columbia University Press: 2006. [Chapters by Alvin Goldman, Harry Collins and Robert Evans, Scott Brewer, Stephen Turner, Peter Singer, Hubert Dreyfus, Helene Mialet, Julia Annas, John Hardwig, Steve Fuller, Paul Feyerabend, Edward Said, Robert Crease and myself, and John Mix and myself.]

(*) Reviews appear in: Ethics, Interdisciplinary Science Review, Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger, Philosophy of Science, Metapsychology, Public Understanding of Science, Quarterly Review of Biology, Isis, Social Studies of Science, and American Journal of Sociology.

4. Five Questions in Philosophy of Technology  (co-edited with Jan Olsen). Automatic/VIP Press: 2007. [Chapters by Peter Singer, Joseph Agassi, Mario Bunge, Harry Collins, Albert Borgmann, Paul Durbin, Andrew Feenberg, Peter Galison, Allan Hanson, Bruno Latour, Don Ihde, Ian Jarvie, Joan Fujimura, Carl Mitcham, Daniel Sarewitz, Dan Seni, Susan Leigh Star, Andrew Pickering, Bill McKibben, Donna Haraway, Lucy Suchman, N. Katherine Hayles, Isabelle Stengers, and myself.]

(*) Reviews appear in: Choice and Science, Technology, and Human Values
(*) 2011, The Browser, Evgeny Morzov selects it as on the top five books in philosophy of technology

5. New Waves in Philosophy of Technology (co-edited with Jan Olsen and Soren Riis).  Palgrave Macmillan: 2009. [Chapters by Keekok Lee, Jan K. Berg Olsen, Robert Rosenberger, David Kaplan, Graham Harman, Peter-Paul Verbeek, Ian Thompson, Phillip Brey, Nick Bostrom, Ben Hale, Casper Bruun Jensen and Christopher Gad, and myself.]

(*) Reviews appear in: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews and Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology.

(*) A review essay appears in Historical Materialism.

6. Rethinking Theories and Practices of Imaging (co-edited with Timothy Engström) Palgrave Macmillan: 2009. [Chapters by Alfred Crosby, Alva Noë, Don Ihde, Patrick Grim, Megan Delehanty, Andy Clark, Vivian Sobchack, Chris Burnett, Cyril Reade, Thomas Keenan, Judy Illes, Simon Malpas, Andrew Feenberg, Timothy Engström, and myself.]

7. Five Questions in Sustainability Ethics (co-edited with Wade Robison and Ryne Raffelle)  Automatic/VIP Press: 2010. [Chapters by Braden Allenby, Richard Bawden, Donald A. Brown, John Baird Callicott, Randall Curren, Aidan Davison, Michael Gormann, Benjamin Hale, Dale Jamieson, Judith Layzer, Steven Moore, John Nolt, Bryan Norton, David Orr, Donald William Scherer, Chris Schlottmann, William Shutkin, Behnam Taebi, Paul Thompson, Michael Zimmerman.]

(*) A review appears in Ethics, Policy, Environment.

8. Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy (co-edited with Jules Polonetsky and Omer Tene). Cambridge University Press: Forthcoming.

Editorial Contributions to Journals and Book Series

1. Proof Editor, Southern Journal of Philosophy (June-August 1997).

2. Book Review Editor, Human Studies A Journal for Philosophy and the Social Sciences (2003-2008).

3. Guest-Editor of special issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, “Cyborg Embodiment: Affect, Agency, Intentionality, and Responsibility” vol. 7, no. 3 (2008). [Articles by Andy Clark, Harry Collins, Jeff Shrager, Don Ihde, Ronald Giere, Peter-Paul Verbeek, Casper Bruun Jensen, Allan Hanson, John Protevi, Eric Dietrich, Timothy Engström and myself.]

4. Guest-Editor of a special issue of Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, “Postphenomenology: Historical and Contemporary Horizons,” vol. 12, no.2 (Spring 2008). [Articles by Larry Hickman, Val Dusek, Dennis Weiss, Don Ihde, and myself.]

5. Book Series Editor “Philosophy of Engineering and Technology” with Springer (2009-2011).

6. Executive Editor of journal Philosophy and Technology with Springer (2010-2012).

7.  Book Symposium Editor for discussion of Moralizing Technology in Philosophy and Technology (forthcoming in print; available through online first). [Articles by Don Ihde, Ibo van de Poel, Martin Peterson, and Peter-Paul Verbeek.]

8. Member of Scientific Editorial Board for journal Philosophy and Technology with Springer (2012-Present).

9. Guest Editor of special issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences (with Gregory Feist and David Stone), “Tacit Knowledge: New Theories and Practices” 12, 2 (2013). [Articles by Harry Collins, Gregory Feist, David Stone, Rodrigo Riberio, Mark Addis, and Theresa Schilhab.]

Professional Articles and Book Chapters

1a. “Dreyfus on Expertise: The Limits of Phenomenological Analysis” (with Robert Crease). Continental Philosophy Review 35 (2002): 245-279.
1b. Reprinted in E. Selinger and R. Crease, eds., The Philosophy of Expertise.  Columbia University Press (2006): 213-245.

2. “Distance and Alignment: Haraway’s and Latour’s Nietzschean Legacies” (with Casper Bruun Jensen). In D. Ihde and E. Selinger, eds., Chasing Technoscience: Matrix for Materiality. Indiana University Press (2003): 195-212.

3. “Interdisciplinary Provocateurs: Philosophically Assessing Haraway and Pickering.” In D. Ihde and E. Selinger, eds., Chasing Technoscience: Matrix for Materiality. Indiana University Press (2003): 147-166.

4. “The Necessity of Embodiment: The Dreyfus-Collins Debate” Philosophy Today 47, no.3 (2003): 266-279.

5. “Expertise and Public Ignorance” Critical Review 15, nos. 3-4 (2003): 375-385.

6. “Feyerabend’s Democratic Argument Against Experts” Critical Review 15, nos. 3-4 (2003): 359-373.
6a. Re-printed in Political Knowledge, eds. Jeffrey Friedman and Shterna Friedman (Routledge: 2012).

7. “Reducing Prejudice: A Spatialized Game-Theoretic Model for the Contact Hypothesis” (with Patrick Grim, et al).  In J. Pollack, M. Bedau, P. Husbands, T. Ikegami, and R. Watson, eds., Artificial Life IX.  MIT Press (2004): 244-249.

8a. “On Interactional Expertise: Pragmatic and Ontological Considerations” (with John Mix)  Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3, no.2 (2004): 145-163.

8b. Reprinted in E. Selinger and R. Crease, eds., The Philosophy of Expertise.  Columbia University Press (2006): 302-321. {Harry Collins’s reply, “The Trouble with Madeleine: Response to E. Selinger and J. Mix,” appears in Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3, no. 2 (2004): 165-170.}

9. “Merleau-Ponty and Epistemology Engines” (with Don Ihde). Human Studies: A Journal for Philosophy and the Human Sciences 27, no.4 (2004): 361-376.

10. “Modeling Prejudice Reduction” (with Patrick Grim, et al.) Public Affairs Quarterly 19, no. 2 (2005): 95-125.

11. “Game-Theoretic Robustness in Cooperation and Prejudice Reduction: A Graphic Measure” (with Patrick Grim, et al). In L. Rocha, L. Yaeger, M. Bedau, D. Floreano, R. Goldstone, and A. Vespignani, eds., ALife X. MIT Press (2006): 445-451.

12. “Normative Technoscience: Reflections on Ihde’s Significant Nudging.” In E. Selinger, ed., Postphenomenology: A Critical Companion to Ihde. SUNY Press (2006): 89-107.

13. “What Kind of Science is Simulation?” (with Robb Eason, Robert Rosenberger, Trina  Kokalis, and Patrick Grim).  The Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 19, 1 (2007): 19-28.

14. “On Naturally Embodied Cyborgs: Identities, Metaphors, and Models” (with Tim Engström).  Janus Head 9, 2 (2007): 553-584. [Andy Clark’s reply, “Negotiating Embodiment: A Reply to Selinger and Engström,” appears in Janus Head 9, 2 (2007): 595-587.]

15. “Technology Transfer: What Can Philosophers Contribute?” Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly 27, 1/2 (2007): 12-17.

16a. “Interactional Expertise and Embodiment” (with Harry Collins and Hubert Dreyfus) Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 38 (2007): 722-740.

16b. Reprinted in David Kaplan, ed. Readings in the Philosophy of Technology, 2nd edition, Roman and Littlefield: (2009), pp. 391-416.

17. “Does Microcredit Empower? Reflections on the Grameen Bank Debate” Human Studies: A Journal for Philosophy and the Human Sciences 31 (2008): 27-41.

18. “Collins’s Incorrect Depiction of Dreyfus’s Critique of Artificial Intelligence” Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 2 (2008): 301-308. [Harry Collins’s reply, “Response to Selinger on Dreyfus,” appears in Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 2 (2008): 309-311).]

19. “A Graphic Measure for Game-Theoretic Robustness” (with Patrick Grim, et. al.) Synthese 163, 2 (2008): 273-297.

20. “Normative Judgment and Technoscience: Nudging Ihde, Again” Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 12, 2 (Spring 2008): 120-125.

21. “Chess-playing Computers and Embodied Grandmasters: In What Ways Does the Difference Matter?” In B. Hale, ed., Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press (2008): 65-87.

22. “Introduction—Cyborg Embodiment: Affect, agency, intentionality, and responsibility” Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 3 (2008): 317-325.

23a. “A Moratorium on Cyborgs: Computation, Cognition, and Commerce” (with Timothy Engström) Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 3 (2008): 327-341.[Andy Clark’s reply, “The Frozen Cyborg: A Reply to Selinger and Engström” appears in Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 3 (2008): 343-346. Eric Dietrich’s reply, “Some Strangeness in the Proportion, or How to stop worrying and learn to love the Mechanistic Forces of Darkness” appears in Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 3 (2008): 349-352.]

23b. Reprinted in Robert Scharff and Val Dusek eds. Philosophy of Technology: The Technological Condition, An Anthology revised edition, Wiley-Blackwell (2014): 631-640.

24. “Interactive Computation is Interaction with What?: A Reply to Clark” (with Timothy Engström) Phenomenology and the Cognitive SciencesPhenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7, 3 (2008): 347-348.

25a. “Technology Transfer and Globalization: A New Wave for Philosophy of Technology?” In J. Olsen, E. Selinger, and S. Riis, eds., New Waves in Philosophy of Technology.  Palgrave McMillan, (2008): 267-291.

25b. Reprinted in David Kaplan, ed. Readings in the Philosophy of Technology, 2nd edition, Roman and Littlefield: (2009), pp. 321-339.

26. “Jagannath’s Saligram: On Bruno Latour and Literary Critique After Postcoloniality” (with Amit Ray) Postmodern Culture 18, 2 (2008): online.

27. “Towards a Reflexive Framework for Development: Technology Transfer After the Empirical Turn” Synthese 168, no. 3 (2009): 377-403.

28a.  “Ethics and Poverty Tours” Philosophy and Public Policy Quarterly 29, 1/2  (2009): 2-7.

28b. Expanded version reprinted in Irving Louis Horowitz, ed., Culture and Civilization vol. 2, Transaction Publishers (2010): pp. 147-165.

29. “Reinventing Sight: Theories and Practices of Imaging” (with Timothy Engström) in T. Engström and E. Selinger, eds., Rethinking Theories and Practices of Imaging, Palgrave (2009): pp. 21-61.

30. “Six Questions About Translational Due Diligence” Science Translational Medicine vol. 2. issue 29 April 28 (2010).

31. “Competence and Trust in Choice Architecture” (with Kyle Whyte) Knowledge, Technology, Policy (special issue on trust and technology ed. Mariarosaria Taddeo) vol. 23, nos. 3-4 (2010): 461-482. [Trevor Pinch’s reply, “Comment on ‘Nudges and Cultural Variance’” appears in Knowledge, Technology, Policy vol. 23, nos. 3-4 (2010): 487-490.  Luc Bovens’s reply, “Nudges and Cultural Variance: A Note on Selinger and Whyte,” appears in Knowledge, Technology, Policy vol. 23, nos. 3-4 (2010): 483-486.]

32. “Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions” (with Jesús Aguilar and Kyle Whyte) Philosophy and Technology 24, no.1 (2010): 83-88.

33. “The Ethics of Poverty Tourism” (with Kevin Outterson), Environmental Philosophy (special issue, “Ecotourism and Environmental Justice” ed. Robert Melchior Figueroa) vol.7, no. 2 (2010): 93-114.

34. “Catastrophe Ethics and Activist Speech: Reflections on Moral Norms, Advocacy, and Technical Judgment” (with Harry Collins and Paul Thompson),Metaphilosophy vol. 42, no. 1-2 (2011): 118-144.

35. “Determining Moral Responsibility for CO2 Emissions: A Reply to Nolt” (with Tom Seager and Susan Spierre) Ethics, Policy, and Environment 14, no.1 (2011): 39-42.

36. “Creating an Innovative Interdisciplinary Healthcare Policy and Management Graduate Certificate Program” (with Kathleen McFadden, Donna Monroe, Gary Chen, and Jay Nafzger) Innovative Higher Education 36 (2011): 161-176.

37.  “Is There a Right Way to Nudge? The Practice and Ethics of Choice Architecture” (with Kyle Whyte) Sociology Compass 5/10 (2011): 923-935.

38. “Poverty Tourism, Justice, and Policy: Can Ethical Ideals Form the Basis of  New Regulations?” (with Kyle Whyte and Kevin Outterson) Public Integrity 14, 1 (Winter 2011-2012): 39-50.

39. “Poverty Tourism and the Problem of Consent” (with Kyle Whyte and Kevin Outterson) Journal of Global Ethics 7, 3 (2011): 337-348.

40a. “Nudge, Nudge, or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs” (with Kyle Whyte, Art Caplan, and Jathan Sadowski) The American Journal of Bioethics 12, 2 (2012): 32-39.  [The following are all replies found in the same issue. Michael Potts, Joseph Verheijde, and Mohammad Rady, “When Nudge Becomes a Shove” (pp. 40-42). Robert Truog, “When Does a Nudge Become a Shove in Seeking Consent for Organ Donation?” (pp. 42-44).  Jennifer Bard, “Lack of Political Will and Public Trust Dooms Presumed Consent” (pp. 44-46). Pelle Guldborg Hansen, “Should We Be ‘Nudging’ for Cadaveric Organ Donations?” (pp. 46-48).]

40b. Reprinted in Replacement Parts: The Ethics of Organ Procurement and Transplantation in Humans, eds. Arthur Caplan and Daniel Reid. Georgetown University Press: forthcoming.

41.  “What Counts as a Nudge?” (with Kyle Whyte) The American Journal of Bioethics 12, 2 (2012): 11-12.

42.  “Nudging Can’t Solve Complex Policy Problems” (with Kyle Whyte) European Journal of Risk Regulation 1 (2012): 26-31.

43. “Using Sustainability Games to Elicit Moral Hypotheses From Scientists and Engineers” (with Tom Seager, Susan Spierre, and David Schwartz). In Per Homann, Jespersen, Soren Riis, and Pernille Almlund (eds.) Rethinking Climate Change Research: Clean-Technology, Culture, and Communication Ashgate: (2012): 117-128.

44. “Sustainable Engineering Science for Resolving Wicked Problems” (with Thomas Seager and Arnim Wiek) Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25, 4 (2012): 467-484.

45. “An Experiential, Game-Theoretic Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics” (with Jathan Sadowski, Thomas Seager, Kyle Whyte, and Susan Spierre) Science and Engineering Ethics (2012): available via Springer online first; print version forthcoming.

46. “Tacit Knowledge: New Theories and Practices” (with Gregory Feist and David Stone) Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12, 2 (2013): 247-250.

47. “The 2010 Human Development Index: Implications for Climate Policy and Sustainable Development” (with Susan Spierre and Thomas Seager). Journal of Sustainable Development 6, 6 (2013): 34-47.

48. “Big Data in Little Hands” (with Woodrow Hartozg) Stanford Law Review Online 66, 81 (2013): 81-88.

49. “Public Philosophy of Technology: Motivations, Barriers, and Reforms” (with D.E. Wittkower and Lucinda Rush). Techne: Research in Philosophy and Technology17:2 (Spring 2014): 179-200.

50. “Creating a Taxonomic Tool for Technocracy and Applying it to Silicon Valley”(with Jathan Sadowski) Technology in Society 38 (2014): 161-168.

51. “Gamification and Morality” (with Jathan Sadowski and Thomas Seager) in The Gameful World: Approaches, Issues, Applications. Eds. Sebastian Deterding and Steffan Walz. MIT Press (2015): 371-392.

52.”Intergroup Cooperation in Common Pool Resource Dilemmas” (with Jathan Sadowski, Susan Spierre, Thomas Seager, et. al) Science and Engineering Ethics 21, 5 (2015): 1197-1215.

53. “Group Tacit Knowledge and Globally Distributed Virtual Teams Lessons Learned from Using Games and Social Media in the Classroom (with Susan Spierre Clark, Andrew Berardy, Mark Hannah, Thomas Seager, and John Vianney Makanda) Connexions 3, 1 (2015): 113-151.

54. “Increasing the Transaction Costs of Harassment” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Boston University Law Review Annex (2015): online.

55. “Don Ihde’s Relevance to the Gun Debates” in Technoscience and Postphenomenology: The Manhattan Papers. Eds. Jan Kyrre Berg Friis and Robert Crease. Lexington Books (2015): 205-209.

56. “Surveillance and Loss of Obscurity” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Washington and Lee Law Review 72, 3 (Summer 2015): 1343-1387.

57. “Facebook’s Emotional Contagion Study and the Ethical Problem of Co-Opted Identity in Mediated Environments Where Users Lack Control” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Research Ethics vol. 12, no. 1 (January 2016): 35-43.

58. “The Internet of Heirlooms and Disposable Things” (with Woodrow Hartzog) North Carolina Journal of Law and Technology 17, 4 (May 2016): 581-598.

59. “Utopia?: A Technologically Determined World of Frictionless Transactions, Optimized Production, and Maximal Happiness” (with Brett Frischmann) UCLA Law Review Discussion 372 (2016): 373-391.

60. “Obscurity and Privacy” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Technology eds. Joseph Pitt and Ashley Shew. (forthcoming) [*NB: Listed here instead of under “Reference Entries” due to comprehensive nature of the text. Submitted version was over 6,000 words.*]

61. “Neo-Liberal Reform and the Big Data University” Foundations of Science (print version forthcoming, online version available via Springer Online First).

Book Reviews, Review Essays, and Symposia Articles

1. Review of Bertrand Russell’s Power. Bertrand Russell Society Quarterly 97 (1998): 16-19.

2. Review (in German) of Don Ihde’s Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science. Journal Phänomenologie 11 (1999): 67-70.

3. Review of Thomas Gieryn’s Cultural Boundaries of Science: Credibility on the Line.The Quarterly Review of Biology 75, no. 4 (2000): 439-440.

4. Review of Peter Singers’s A Darwinian Left: Politics, Evolution, and Cooperation. The Quarterly Review of Biology 76, no. 3 (2001): 335.

5. Review of Kevin Davies’s Cracking the Genome: Inside the Race to Unlock Human DNA. The Quarterly Review of Biology 76, no.4 (2001): 492.

6. Review of Isabelle Stengers’s The Invention of Modern Science. The Quarterly Review of Biology 77, no.2 (2002): 182-184.

7. Review of Francis Fukuyama’s Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution. The Quarterly Review of Biology 78, no.1 (2003): 76-77.

8. Review of Philip Kitcher’s Science, Truth, and Democracy. The Quarterly Review of Biology 78, no.1 (2003): 77-78.

9. Review of Leon Kass’s Life, Liberty, and the Defense of Dignity: The Challenge for Bioethics. The Quarterly Review of Biology 78, no.3 (2003): 343-345.

10. “Embodying Technoscience” Journal of Applied Philosophy 20, no. 1 (2003): 101-107.  [This is a critical discussion of Don Ihde’s Bodies in Technology.  Ihde’s reply is on pp. 108-111.]

11. “The Wonder of Phenomenology.” Review of Maxine Sheets-Johnstone’s The Primacy of Movement. Human Studies: A Journal for Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Vol. 27, no.1 (2004): 107-112.

12. Review of Michael Fumento’s Bioevolution: How Biotechnology is Changing the World.  The Quarterly Review of BiologyThe Quarterly Review of Biology 79, no.3 (2004): 294-295.

13. Review of Todd May’s Reconsidering Difference: Derrida, Levinas, Nancy, Deleuze. International Studies in Philosophy 35, no. 4 (2004): 361-362.

14. Review of Robert Figueroa’s and Sandra Harding’s, eds., Science and Other Cultures. The Quarterly Review of Biology 80, no.1 (2005): 95-96.

15. “Towards a Postphenomenology of Artifacts.”  Review of Peter-Paul Verbeek’s What Things DoTechné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 9, no. 2 (2005): 128-134.

16.  Review of Michael Ruse’s The Evolution-Creation StruggleQuarterly Review of Biology 81, no.1 (2006): 53-54.

17. Review of Ronald Giere’s Scientific Perspectivism. Quarterly Review of Biology 82, 4 (2007): 407-409.

18. “Architecture and Philosophy: Reflections on Arakawa and Gins” (with Jondi Keane) Footprint: The Journal of the Delft School of Design (Autumn 2008): 135-142.

19. “Technological Fixes,” a review of Evgeny Morozov’s To Save Everything Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism, Wilson Quarterly Spring (2013).

20. “Replicated Copies,” a review essay of Bianca Bosker’s Original Copies: Architectural Mimicry in Contemporary China. Los Angeles Review of Books August 30, (2013).  Online.

21. “Further Philosophical Reflections on Expertise” (a response to Heather Douglas and William Rheg). The entire debate is published in Philosophy and Technology 26, 1 (2013): 93-109.

22. “OkCupid’s XOXO for Big Surveillance,” a review essay of Christian Rudder’s Dataclysm: Who We Are When We Think No One’s Looking. Los Angeles Review of Books October 20th (2014). Online.

23. “Confronting the Moral Dimensions of Technology Through Mediation Theory.” Philosophy and Technology
25, 4 (2014): 287-313.

24. “The Politics of Expertise, Patronage, and Public Engagement” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, 8 (2014): 13-18. [This is a critical discussion of Stephen Turner’s The Politics of Expertise. His reply, “Thinking Epistemically About Experts and Publics: A Reply to Selinger” can be found in Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3, 9 (2014): 35-43.]

25. “The Tool of Their Tools,” a review essay of Nicholas Carr’s The Glass Cage: Automation and Us (with Jathan Sadowski)The New Atlantis 43 (Summer/Fall 2014): 107-116.

26. “Too Much Magic, Too Little Social Friction: Why Objects Shouldn’t Be Enchanted,” a review essay of David Rose’s Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things. Los Angeles Review of Books January 8, 2015: (online).

27. “The Black Box Within: Quantified Selves, Self-Directed Surveillance, and the Dark Side of Datification,” a review essay of Luke Dormehl’s The Formula: How Algorithms Solve All Our Problems–And Create More. Los Angeles Review of Books February 7, 2015: (online).

28. “Blaming the Internet is Not the Answer,” a review essay of Andrew Keen’s The Internet is not the Answer. Los Angeles Review of Books May 16, 2015: (online).

29. “Bursting the Optimistic Technology Bubble,” a review essay of Martin Ford’s Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless FutureLos Angeles Review of Books July 31, 2015: (online).

30. Review of John Markoff’s Machines of Loving Grace: The Question for Common Ground Between Humans and ComputersSan Francisco Chronicle August 19, 2015: (online).

31. “Internet Privacy: Stepping Up Our Self-Defense Game,” Los Angeles Review of Books, a review essay of Finn Brunton and Helen Nissenbaum’s Obfuscation: A User’s Guide for Privacy and Protest November 10, 2015: (online).

Chronicle of Higher Education

1. “Ethics Goes Digital” (with Thomas Seager) The Chronicle of Higher Education October 1, 2012.

2. “Entrepreneurship: Part of a Liberal Education” (with Andy Phelps) The Chronicle of Higher Education September 30, 2013.

Software Developed

1. TURINEX: an updated version of the Turing Test that can be used to test for tacit knowledge transmission (with Russell Uhl, Thomas Seager, and Andrew Berardy).

Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceedings

1. “Experiential Teaching Strategies for Ethical Reasoning Skills Relevant to Sustainability” (with Tom Seager) Proceedings of the2009 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology.

2. “Debunking the Fallacy of the Individual Decision-maker: An Experiential Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics” (with Tom Seager, et al.)  Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology. 

3. “Determining An Equitable Allocation of Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions” (with Susan Spierre and Thomas Seager). Proceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology.

4. “Using Non-cooperative Games to Simulate Ethical Tensions in Climate Policy Negotiations” (with Susan Spierre, Thomas Seager, and Jathan Sadowski).Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology.

5. “Developing a Pedagogy of Interactional Expertise for Sustainability Education” (with Andrew Berardy and Thomas Seager.). Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology.

National Science Foundation White Papers

1. “Clarifying the Developmental and Psychological Dimensions of Interactional Expertise as a Function of Social and Psychological Relations Between Tacit and Explicit Knowledge” (with David Stone, Christopher Schunn, and Barbara Koslowski) (2010). [NSF award # 1024477]

Public Scholarship

1. “Human Genome Project: Public Perception and Expert Evaluation” Contexts: A Forum for Medical Humanities 9, no. 3 (2001): 9-13. [Contexts was a forum for multidisciplinary and public discussion of ethical healthcare issues associated with the Center for Medical Humanities at Stony Brook University.]

2. “An Innovation University,” Future Orientation,Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies Magazine (special issue on “Knowledge Work”) January (2009): 45-47. (The article is published in both English and Danish.) [The Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies is a international think tank devoted to “strengthening the basis for decision-making in public and private organizations by creating awareness of the future and highlighting its importance to the present.”]

3. “Nudging Utopia” (with Soren Riis and Kyle Whyte), Future Orientation,Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies Magazine (special issue on “Utopia”) vol. 1 (2010): 29-33. [The Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies is a international think tank devoted to “strengthening the basis for decision-making in public and private organizations by creating awareness of the future and highlighting its importance to the present.”]

4. “Concerns About Nudging,” Initiative for Science, Society, and Policy Essay Series Vol. 2 (2011).

5. “Occupy Wall Street is a part of the major shift in ethical behavior among young people” (with Thomas Seager), Slate Nov. 8, 2011.

6. “Why Occupy Wall Street is So Hard to Understand” (with Thomas Seager), The Atlantic Dec. 1, 2011.

7. “How’s My Avatar Get Into That Sneaker Ad?” (with Shaun Foster), Slate Jan. 04, 2012. [Reposted by The Browser.]

8. “The Technologically Enhanced Memory,” Slate February 14, 2012. [Reposted by The Browser.]

9. “E i cacciatori di dati personali costruiscono spot mirati,” Corriere della Sera March 4, 2012, p. 7 of “La Lettura.”

10. “Why It’s OK to Let Apps Make You a Better Person” The Atlantic March 02, 2002. [Re-posted by the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology. Mentioned inNY Times bog “The Stone”.]

11. “When the Morality Pill Becomes a Thoughtless Experiment” (with Thomas Seager and Jathan Sadowski) Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology March 26, 2012.

12. “Peace Prize for Homeless Hotspots” 3 Quarks Daily April 02, 2012. [Reposted by the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

13. “New Moral Problems and New Approaches: Millennials Compared to Baby Boomers and Generation X” (with Thomas Seager and Jathan Sadowski) The Sustainability Review Issue 3, Vol. 3 April 16, 2012.

14. “Was Hitler a Bully? Teaching the Holocaust to Kids” Slate April 20, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

15. “Are Millennials Less Green Than Their Parents?” with Tom Seager and Jathan Sadowski. 3 Quarks Daily May 28, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

16. “What Happens When We Turn the World’s Most Famous Robot Test on Ourselves?” The Atlantic June 20, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and The Browser.]

17. “L’anima delle cose” (“The Soul of Things”) in Corriere della Sera July 1, 2012. [This is a feature article, translated into Italian, on Ian Bogost’s Alien Phenomenology.]

18. “Digital Jiminy Crickets” (with Thomas Seager) Slate July 13, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

19. “Ultrasound Technology Can Impede Informed Consent” 3 Quarks Daily July 23, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and The Browser.]

20a. “The Philosophy of the Technology of the Gun” The Atlantic July 23, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and The Browser.]

20b. David Dobbs provides new introduction to the essay and re-posts it with a new title. “We Grip the Gun and the Gun Grips Us.” Wired Dec. 21, 2012.

21. “Climate Change and Inter-Group Cooperation” (with Jathan Sadowski and Thomas Seager). This View of Life July 24, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

22. “Nietzsche’s Transformative Typewriter” Cyborgology  July 26, 2012.

23. “Nudge, Nudge: Can Software Prompt Us Into Being More Civil?” The Atlantic July 30, 2012. [Re-posted by The Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and 3 Quarks Daily]

24. “Why Do We Call New Technologies ‘Creepy’?” Slate August 22, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

25. “Future of Privacy Forum Director: Browser Settings Should Be As Easy to Navigate as a Car” (Interview with Jules Polonetsky) Slate August 23, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

26. “But Everybody’s Doing It: Lance Armstrong and the Philosophy of Making Bad Decisions” The Atlantic August 28, 2012 [Re-posted by 3 Quarks Daily and Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology. Mentioned in NY Times blog “The Stone.”]

27. “Lab Rats in the Social Experiment of Personalized Advertising” Huffington Post August 29, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

28. “Impatience as a Digital Virtue” Huffington Post September 6, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

29. “Saintly Simulation” 3 Quarks Daily September 17, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and Huffington Post (under new title, “Will Outsourcing Morality to Technology Diminish Our Humanity?”.]

30. “Can a Robot Learn to Cook?” (with Evelyn Kim) The Atlantic October 9, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

31. “How to Make a Spy Exhibit Boring” (with John Mix) Slate October 10, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

32. “Why We Need New Rights to Privacy” Slate Nov. 2, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

33. “The Online Funeral” Wall Street Journal Nov. 6, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging TechnologyHuffington Post, and 3 Quarks Daily]

34. “Augmented-Reality Racism” The Atlantic Dec. 16, 2012. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology].

35. “Obscurity: A Better Way to Think About Your Data Than ‘Privacy’” (with Woodrow Hartzog) The Atlantic January 17, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. Mentioned in NY Times “Bits” blog. Discussed in The Nation and Businessweek.]

36. “What Can Sci-Fi Teach Us About the Present and Future of Information?” Huffington Post January 24, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

37. “Quitters Never Win: The Costs of Leaving Social Media” (with Woodrow Hartzog) The Atlantic February 15, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

38. “Does My Daughter Need to Grow Up Because Selena Gomez Did?” Huffington Post  March 15, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

39. “How We’re Turning Digital Natives Into Etiquette Sociopaths” Wired March 26, 2013. [Re-posted by 3 Quarks Daily and Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

40. “Facebook Home Propaganda Makes Selfishness Contagious” Wired April 22, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and mentioned inNY Times blog “The Stone”.]

41. “Fighting Facebook, A Campaign for a People’s Terms of Service” (with Ari Melber and Woodrow Hartzog) The Nation May  22, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.]

42. “Don’t Let Nudges Become Shoves” New Scientist June 22, 2013, p. 37. [Re-posted in Slate as “When Nudge Comes to Shove”. Also re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

43. “The ‘Mood Graph’: How Our Emotions Are Taking Over the Web” Wired August 19, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

44. “E-Etiquette in the Classroom” Wall Street Journal Review Section, C-3. September 7, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

45. “What’s the Right Balance for Protecting Privacy and Promoting Accountability on the Internet?” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Forbes September 27, 2013. [Re-posted byInstitute for Ethics and Emerging Technology and Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.]

46. “Humans are Already More ‘Enhanced’ by Technology Than We Realize” Slate October 3, 2013.

47. “The Chilling Implications of Democratizing Big Data: Facebook Graph Search is Only the Beginning”(with Woodrow Hartog) Forbes October 16, 2013. [Re-posted byInstitute for Ethics and Emerging Technology]

48. “Why is Facebook Putting Teens at Risk?” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Bloomberg Opinion October 24, 2013. [Re-posted by Newsday]

49. “How Not to Be a Jerk With Your Stupid Smartphone” The Atlantic Nov. 3, 2013.  [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

50. “What You Don’t Say About Data Can Still Hurt You” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Forbes Nov. 21, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

51. “Google Files Creepy Patent to Automate Your Social Media Voice” Slate December 3, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

52. “Why Debating Apple’s ‘Misunderstood’ is an Amazing Holiday Gift” Forbes December  23, 2013. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

53. “Keep on Tweeting–There’s No Techno-Fix for Incivility or Injustice” Forbes January 2, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

54. “Why Grandma Shouldn’t Have Posted Instagram Pics on Facebook” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Forbes January 8, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

55. “I See You: The Database that Facial Recognition Apps Need to Survive” (with Woodrow Hartzog) The Atlantic January 23, 2014. [Re-posted by Atlantic Cities.]

56. “5 Ways to Avoid Being Suckered by Unreliable Information” Forbes January 25, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

57. “Inside Google’s Mysterious Ethics Board” (with Patrick Lin) Forbes February 3, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

58. “Why App Developers May Be Selling Their Souls To Apple and Google” Forbes February 8, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

59. “The Outsourced Lover” The Atlantic February 14, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

60. “Today’s Apps Are Turning Us Into Sociopaths” Wired February 26, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

61. “Watching You Play: Can A Dystopian Video Game Help Us Better Appreciate the Value of Privacy?” Forbes March 04, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

62. “Colleges Need to Act Like Start Ups–Or Risk Becoming Obsolete” (with Andrew Phelps) Wired March 05, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

63. “Coping With Unsafe Campuses: Maybe Phones, Not Guns” Forbes March 29, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

64. “Why Goal Tracking Apps are So Existentially Provocative” Forbes April 9, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

65. “Don’t Outsource Your Dating Life” CNN May 1, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

66. “Too Titillating for Twitter: Why Outsourcing Social Media Participation is Disconcerting” Forbes May 5, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

67. “Google Can’t Forget You, But It Should Make You Hard to Find” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Wired May 21, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

68. “Google vs. our humanity: How the emerging ‘Internet of Things’ is turning us into robots” Salon May 22, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

69. “You’ve Been Obsessing Over Your Likes and Retweets Way Too Much” Wired June 06, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

70. “How to Stop Facebook From Making Us Pawns In It’s Corporate Agenda” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Wired July 1, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

71. “Revisiting Kristof’s Criticism of Academic Irrelevance” (with D.E. Wittkower and Lucina Rush) 3 Quarks Daily July 7, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

72.  “Why We Should Be Careful About Adopting Social Robots” Forbes July 18, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

73. “The Trifecta of Roommate Selection Technology: Privacy, Prejudice, and Diversity” Forbes July 20, 2014. [Re-posted by Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology.]

74.”Why A Philosopher Teaches Privacy” Forbes August 21, 2014.

75. “Why Predictive Shopping Might Be Bad For The Future” Forbes August 21, 2014.

76. “Two Reasons Why Extreme Social Surveillance Doesn’t Replace Privacy” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Forbes September 1, 2014.

77. “Robot Servants Are Going To Make Your Life Easy. Then They’ll Ruin It” Wired September 5, 2014.

78. “Why Smart Phones Should Protect Us From Selfie Sabotage” (with Woodrow Hartog) Forbes September 10, 2014.

79. “Why It’s Too Easy To Dismiss Technology Critics: Or, The Fallacies Leading A Reviewer To Call Nicholas Carr Paranoid” Forbes September 19, 2014.

80. “Can Predictive Technology Make Us Less Predictable?” Forbes September 27, 2014.

81. “Talking Privacy With The ACLU’s Jay Stanley” Forbes October 19, 2014.

82. “Philosopher Michael Lynch Says Privacy Violations Are An Affront To Human Dignity” Forbes October 24, 2014.

83. “The case against publishing hacked Sony e-mails” Christian Science Monitor December 12, 2014.

84. “With big data invading campus, universities risk unfairly profiling their students” Christian Science Monitor January 13, 2015.

85. “Will autocomplete make you too predictable?” BBC January 15, 2015

86. “Frank Pasquale unravels the new machine age of algorithms and bots” Christian Science Monitor January 28, 2015.

87. “What is intellectual privacy and how yours is being violated” Christian Science Monitor February 25, 2015.

88. “Why domestic drones stir more debate than ones used in warfighting abroad” Christian Science Monitor March 9, 2015.

89. “How to defeat Internet bullies” Christian Science Monitor March 27, 2015.

90. “Will privacy survive a Digital Age of corporate surveillance?” Christian Science Monitor April 1, 2015.

91. “Why you have a right to obscurity” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Christian Science Monitor April 15, 2015.

92. “If predictive algorithms can craft the best e-mails, we’re all in big trouble” Christian Science Monitor April 27, 2015.

93. “Is Privacy Dead?” Aeon Ideas May 7, 2015.

94. “Is student privacy erased as classrooms turn digital?” Christian Science Monitor May 13, 2015.

95. “Automating walking is the first step to a dystopian nightmare” WiredUK May 20, 2015.

96. “Inside the casino, the house is always watching” Christian Science Monitor June 3, 2015.

97. “It’s time for an about-face on facial recognition” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Christian Science Monitor June 22, 2015.

98. “Google’s action on revenge porn opens the door on the right to be forgotten in the US” (with Woodrow Hartzog) The Guardian June 25, 2015.

99. “Will the internet of things result in predictable people?” (with Brett Frischmann) The Guardian August 10, 2015.

100.”The Dangers of Trusting Robots” (with Woodrow Hartzog) BBC Future August 14, 2015.

101. “How digital voyeurism is destroying privacy”Christian Science Monitor August 26, 2015.

102. “The case for safeguarding students’ digital privacy” (with Brenda Leong) Christian Science Monitor September 17, 2015.

103. “How Obsessive Self-Tracking is Ruining Privacy for Everyone” Christian Science Monitor September 23, 2015.

104. “Presidential campaigns’ thirst for big data threatens voter privacy” (with Joseph Jerome and Elliott Murray) Christian Science Monitor October 14, 2015.

105. “It’s time to give up on the perfect ideal of privacy online” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Aeon Nov. 24, 2015.

106. “Schools fail to recognize the privacy consequences of social media” (with Brenda Leong and Bill Fitzgerald) Christian Science Monitor January 20, 2016.

107a.”Why does privacy really matter?” Christian Science Monitor April 22, 2016.
107b. Reprinted in Internet Abuses and Privacy Rights ed. Betsy Maury, Greyhouse Publishing: Forthcoming.

108. “When Selfies Become Surveillance Beacons” (with Woodrow Hartzog). Part of “Me: The Limitless Self Group Exhibition” Schirn Mag May 7, 2016.

109. “Justin Bieber deserves privacy, too” Christian Science Monitor May 16, 2016.

110. “The ugliest side of facial recognition technology” (with Woodrow Hartzog) Christian Science Monitor May 27, 2016.

111. Interviewed by John Danaher about “Algorithmic Outsourcing and the Value of Privacy” on “Algogracy and Transhumanism Podcast”.

112. “What parents don’t get about cyberbullying”Christian Science Monitor November 28, 2016.

113. “Why it’s dangerous to outsource our critical thinking to computers” (with Brett Frischmann) The Guardian December 10, 2016.

114. “Does the health data industry prioritize profits over patients?” Christian Science Monitor February 1, 2017.

115. “You’ll never shop alone today” Christian Science Monitor March 13, 2017.

Reference Entries

1. “Don Ihde,” Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers, Thoemess Continuum, ed. John Shook (2005): 1206-1208.

2. “Bruno Latour,” Edinburgh Dictionary of Continental Philosophy, Edinburgh University Press, ed. John Protevi (2005).
2a. Reprinted in A Dictionary of Continental Philosophy, Yale University Press, ed. John Protevi (2006): 351-352.

3. “Actor Network Theory,” Edinburgh Dictionary of Continental Philosophy, Edinburgh University Press, ed. John Protevi (2005).
3a. Reprinted in A Dictionary of Continental Philosophy, Yale University Press, ed. John Protevi (2006): 6-7.

4. “Quasi-Object,” Edinburgh Dictionary of Continental Philosophy, Edinburgh University Press, ed. John Protevi (2005).
4a. Reprinted in A Dictionary of Continental Philosophy, Yale University Press, ed. John Protevi (2006): 478.

5. “Participation,” Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics vol. 3. Macmillan Reference, ed. C. Mitcham (2005): 1380-1384.

6. “Television,” Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics vol. 4. Macmillan Reference, ed. C. Mitcham (2005): 1920-1924.

7. “Expertise,” (with Robert Crease).  Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics vol. 2. Macmillan Reference, ed. C. Mitcham (2005): 731-739.

8. “Cyborg,” Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, eds. S. Pederson, J. Olsen, and F. Hendricks (2009): 154-156.

9. “Simulation,” Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, eds. S. Pederson, J. Olsen, and V. Hendricks (2009): 157-159.

10. “Technology Transfer,” Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, eds. S. Pederson, J. Olsen, and V. Hendricks (2009): 329-332.

11. “Expertise,” Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, eds S. Pederson, J. Olsen, and V. Hendricks (2009): 202-204.

12. “Politics and Technology,” Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Technology, eds S. Pederson, J. Olsen, and V. Hendricks (2009): 297-302.

13. “Philosophy of Technology,” (with Stig Andur Pederson, Jan Kyrre Berg Olson, and Soren Riis)  Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy (2010): online.

14. “The Philosophy of Expertise” (with Kyle Whyte) Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences Vol. II, Sage, ed. Byron Kaldis (2013): 721-723.

Interviews and Translations

1. Interview with Bruno Latour. In D. Ihde and E. Selinger, eds., Chasing Technoscience: Matrix for Materiality. Indiana University Press (2003): 15-26.

2. Interview with Don Ihde. In D. Ihde and E. Selinger, eds., Chasing Technoscience: Matrix for Materiality. Indiana University Press (2003): 117-130.

3. Interview with Manuel De Landa, “1000 Years of War: Interview with Manuel De Landa.” Ctheory (2003): online.
3a. Reprinted in Life in the Wires: The Ctheory Reader, Arthur and Marilouise Kroker, eds., Ctheory Books (2004): 135-154.

4. Translation of Bernhard Waldenfels, “From Intentionality to Responsivity.” Revue Roumaine de Philosophie Vol. 47, No. 1 (2003): 15-27. Co-translator (from German) with Robb E. Eason and C. Edward Emmer (final version Waldenfels).

5. Interview with me in J. Olsen and E. Selinger, 5 Questions in Philosophy of Technology (VIP Press: 2007): 183-200.

ELECTED POSITIONS IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

1. Elected to Board of Society for Philosophy and Technology, 2014-2018.

CONFERENCE ORGANIZATION

1. Co-directed (with Timothy Engström) the conference “Rethinking Theories and Practices of Imaging: Technology, Representation, and the Disciplines.” Rochester Institute of Technology (2004).  Main speakers: Peter Galison, Vivian Sobchack, Patrick Grim, Kenneth Jolls, and Megan Delhantey.
(*) Chris Burnett’s review, “Image Trouble,” appears in After Image: The Journal of Media Arts and Cultural Criticism vol. 32, no. 1 (2004): 10-11.

2. Co-organized (with Don Ihde) “New Directions Past the Science Wars: Themes from Haraway and Latour.”  Society for the Social Studies of Science, Paris, France (2004).

3. Organized panel on Postphenomenology for annual meeting of the Society for Philosophy of Technology (2007).  Participants include: Don Ihde, Larry Hickman, Val Dusek, Dennis Weiss, and myself.

4. Co-directed (with Wade Robison and Ryne Raffaelle) the conference “Sustainability Ethics.”  Rochester Institute of Technology (2009).  Main speakers: Bryan Norton, Paul Thompson, Braden Allenby, William Shutkin, and David Orr.

5. Co-directed the “Technology, Culture and Globalization” track (with Charles Ess) for the annual meeting of the Society for Philosophy of Technology, University of Twente, Netherlands (2009).

6. Reviewer for the “Converging Technologies and Human Enhancement” track for the annual meeting of the Society for Philosophy of Technology, University of Twente, Netherlands (2009).

7. Co-directed Mellon Foundation funded workshop on translational research with Theodore Brown, University of Rochester (2009).  Main speakers: Daniel Kevles, Arthur Caplan, Robert Martensen, and Susan Lindee.

8. Co-directed NSF funded workshop with Greg Feist and David Stone, “Acquiring and Using Interactional Expertise: Psychological, Sociological, and Philosophical Perspectives,” University of California at Berkeley (2010).

9. Co-directed NSF funded workshop with Thomas Seager, Susan Spierre, and Jathan Sadowsi, “Towards an Experiential Pedagogy of Sustainability Ethics Instructor Workshop,” Troy, NY (2011).

KEYNOTE, PLENARY, & FEATURE PRESENTATIONS

1. “The (Post) Phenomenology of Technoscience: Praxis and Normativity After the Empirical Turn,” Copenhagen Conference on the Philosophy of Technology, Carlsberg Academy, Denmark (2005).

2. “Embodiment, AI, and Expertise: The Problem of Extrapolation,” Copenhagen Conference on the Philosophy of Technology, Roskilde University, Denmark (2007).

3. “What Does Globalization Mean for the Philosophy of Technology?,” Danish Philosophical Society, Roskilde University, Denmark (2007).

4. “Bodies at Risk: The Moral Debate Surrounding Poverty Tourism,” Shaping Bodies: Knowing Bodies in a Socio-Technical Culture, Carlsberg Academy, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009).

5. “Philosophical Reflections on the Electric Car,” Values in Socio-Technical Systems workshop, Delft University, Netherlands (2010).

6. “Using the Externalities Game to Generate Moral Hypotheses about CO2 Emissions,” RUC Climate-Change-Communication Conference, Roskilde University, Copenhagen, Denmark (2010). [Presented on collaborative research done with Thomas Seager and Susan Spierre.]

7. “Cap and Trade Ethics: The Normative Significance of Asymmetric Technological Development,” Society for Philosophy of Technology, University of North Texas (2011). [Presented on collaborative research done with Thomas Seager, Susan Spierre, and Jathan Sadowski.]

8. Roundtable discussant for thought leader meeting that brought together participants from industry, the media, academia, government, think tanks, and advocacy to discuss privacy in the Information Age and the concerns of Middle Class Americans. Sponsored by The Atlantic, The National Journal, and Allstate Insurance Company, The Watergate, Washington, DC (2013).

9. Featured speaker at “All Eyes on Privacy: Transparency in the New Economy,” sponsored by The Atlantic, The National Journal, and Allstate Insurance Company, The Newseum Knight Conference Center, Washington, DC (2013).

10. Feature speaker at “Big Data and Privacy: Making Ends Meet,” sponsored by Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society and the Future of Privacy Forum, Microsoft Innovation and Policy Center, Washington, DC (2013).

11. “Etiquette as Ethical Subversion,” keynote given at St. John Fisher for “World Philosophy Day,” Rochester, NY (2013).

12. Feature presentation, “The Ethical Implications of Detonating an Etiquette Bomb,” given at the conference, “21st Century Virtue: Cultivating Character with New Technologies,” sponsored by the Santa Clara Philosophy Department and the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, at Santa Clara university.

13. “The Outsourcing Illusion: Why Tempting Technology Can Lead to Dangerous Delegation,” feature presentation in the Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere speaker series, “The Work of the Humanities: Critical Thinking in Labor and Life,” University of Florida (2014).

CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS, & INVITED TALKS

1. “Inessential Commonality and Community: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Interpretation of Mitsein.” Annual Crossing the Boundaries Conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York (1996).

2. “Orpheus’s Optics: Blanchot and Irigaray on the Gaze.” Virginia Humanities Conference, Mary Washington College, Fredericksburg, Virginia (1997).

3. “Anarchic Geology: Derrida and Husserl on Nature.” 7th Annual PIC Conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York (1997).

4. “The Conflict between Faith and Reason: Descartes, Hume, and Kant.” Judaic Studies Department. University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee (1997).

5. “Plato’s Tragic Justice.” 22nd Annual International Utopian Studies Conference. University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee (1997).

6. “Derrida’s Rhetoric of Blindness: Memory as the Ruin of Mourning.” 22nd annual Collegium Phaenomenologicum, Perugia. Italy (1998).

7. “Derrida’s Extra Mundane Logic.” 22nd Annual Mid-South Philosophy Conference. University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee (1998).

8. “The Provocation of Eternal Return: Deleuze and Blanchot on Nietzsche.” 8th Annual PIC Conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY (1998).

9. “The Temporal Difference Between Andrew Pickering and Donna Haraway.” Philosophy Research Forum, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (1999).

10. “A Hermeneutic Interpretation of the Expert-Lay Divide.” 4S/EASST Conference, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria (2000).

11. “Can ‘Values Experts’ Bridge the gap between Experts and the Public?” 6th International Conference on Public Communication of Science & Technology, CERN Laboratory, Geneva, Switzerland (2001).

12. “Hubert Dreyfus and the Transparency of Expertise.” Organizing Visions: The Ambivalence of Transparency in Science, Technology, and Politics, Department of STS, Cornell University, New York (2002).

13. “Experts and Democracy.” Knowledge in Plural Context, Lausanne, Switzerland (2002).

14. “What is an Expert?” Long Island Philosophical Society, Department of Philosophy, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York (2002).

15. “Epistemology Engines: The Role of Embodiment in Science and Technology.” Book Symposia to Celebrate the Publication of Don Ihde’s Bodies in Technology, Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (2002).

16. “Bruno Latour and Expertise.” Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois (2002).

17. “Expertise and the Question of Lay Ability.” Philosophical Colloquium, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York (2002).

18. “A Victory of Mind Over Machine: Can Phenomenology be a Normative Theory of Technology?” Philosophical Colloquium, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York (2002).

19. “Embodiment and Linguistic Socialization.” Philosophical Colloquium, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York (2003).

20. “Prejudice Reduction in Artificial Societies: A Computational Model for the Contact Hypothesis.” Society for Minds and Machines, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division Meeting, Washington, D.C. (2003).

21. “The Future of Humanity is the Humanities.” Henry and Mary Kearse Distinguished Lecture, Kearse Award Ceremony. Rochester Institute of Technology (2004).

22. “Reducing Prejudice: A Spatialized Game-Theoretic Model for the Contact Hypothesis.” Ninth Annual Conference on the Simulation and Synthesis of Living Systems. Boston, Massachusetts (2004).

23. “Jagannath’s Move: Latour and the Dalit Unconscious.”  Society for the Social Studies of Science, Paris, France (2004).

24. “From Writing to Imaging: Technology, Agency, and the Reconfiguration of Social Experience” (with Timothy Engström). International Conference on Technology, Knowledge, and Society, Berkeley, California (2005).

25. “Cyborg Technology and the Question of Agency” (with Timothy Engström). The Applied Philosophy Group, NYU, New York (2005).

26. “Just When You Thought You Knew What You Were Doing: Challenging Pedagogy & Your Discipline Through Team-Teaching” (with Timothy Engström). Faculty Institute on Teaching and Learning, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York (2005).

27.  “From Textuality to Imaging: Technology, Agency, and the Reorganization of Experience” (with Timothy Engström).  6th Congress of the International Society for Universal Dialogue, Humanity at the Turning Point: Rethinking Nature, Culture, and Freedom, Helsinki, Finland (2005). 

28.  “From Texts to Images: Technology, Philosophy, and the Reorganization of Experience” (with Timothy Engström).  Material Cultures and the Creation of Knowledge, Edinburgh, Scotland (2005).  

29. “Cyborg Ethics and Cognition Enhancing Technologies,” Hale Series in Applied Ethics, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York (2005).

30. “Wittgenstein’s Philosophy of Language: An Introduction,” Honors Seminar in Experimental Writing, RIT (2005).

31. “On Interactional Expertise: Some Lingering Questions,” Towards a History and Philosophy of Expertise, Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia (2006). [For a review of this conference, see Chemical Heritage 24, 3 (2006): 43.]

32. “Are we Really Human?” McMurray Lecture in Philosophy, Monroe Community College, New York (2006).

33. “Game-Theoretic Robustness in Cooperation and Prejudice Reduction: A Graphic Measure” (with Patrick Grim, et. al.) ALife X, Indiana University, Indiana (2006).

34. “Political and Existential Economies of Imaging: Technology, Identity, and Social Agency” (with Timothy Engström).  The Science and Democracy Network, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2006).

35. “What Kind of Science is Simulation?” (with Patrick Grim, et al).  North American Computing and Philosophy Conference, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2006).

36. “Does Globalization Empower?” Society for Phenomenology and the Human Sciences, Philadelphia (2006).

37. “Technology Transfer and Empowerment,” Hale Series in Applied Ethics, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York (2007).

38. “Globalization and the Philosophy of Technology,” Center for Philosophy of Technology and Engineering Science, University of Twente, Netherlands (2007).

39. “Normative Judgment and Technoscience: Nudging Ihde, Again,” Society for Philosophy of Technology, Charleston, SC (2007).

40. “Side Effects: Participatory Medicine and Feigned Participation,” Studies of Expertise and Experience, Cardiff University, Wales (2007).

41. Commentator on “Politicizing Methodology: Standardization Debates in Behavioral Genetics” by invitation of The Interface of Humanities and Sciences / Technology Cluster of the Central New York Humanities Corridor (made possible by support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation), Syracuse University (2007).

42. “Digital Development and the Technological Configuration of Culture,” Department of Philosophy and Religion Studies, Department of North Texas (2007).

43. “Poverty Tourism: An Ethical Assessment,” Honors Philosophy class, Department of North Texas (2007).

44. “On Animality, Landing Sites, and Embodied Transformation,” 2nd Annual Arakawa and Gins Philosophy and Architecture Conference, Slought Foundation and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (2008).

45. “Human Exceptionalism: Reflections on Technology, Socialization, and Embodiment,” Institute for Advanced Study, University of Minnesota (2008).

46. “Environmental Justice and the Green Revolution,” International Association for Environmental Philosophy, Allenspark, Colorado (2008).

47. “Expertise, Genetically Modified Food, and World Hunger” (with Paul Thompson and Harry Collins) 2nd Annual Conference of the Studies of Expertise and Experience, Cardiff, Wales (2008).

48. “Expertise and the GMO Debate: Normative Assessment” (with Paul Thompson and Harry Collins) Society for the Social Studies of Science, Rotterdam, Netherlands (2008).

49. “Innovation and Responsible Development,” Social Impact Speaker Series, Walden University (2008).  Archived online: http://www.waldenu.edu/c/media/14663.htm

50. “Interactional Expertise and Multidisciplinary Collaboration,” Northern Illinois University (2009).

51. “Rethinking Techno-fixes in the Context of the Geo-Engineering Debates,” Plenary Panel: Intersections Between Philosophy of Technology and Environmental Philosophy, Society for Philosophy of Technology, Twente University, Netherlands (2009).

52. “A Precautionary Principle for Philosophers of Technology: When Appeals to Human Nature Are Justified,” Society for Philosophy of Technology, Twente University, Netherlands (2009).

53. “Globalisation and the Innovation University,” Society for Philosophy of Technology, Twente University, Netherlands (2009).

54. “Game Design and Game Theory: A Sustainability Ethics Project” (with Tom Seager), RIT Gaming Dept (2009).

55. “Using Games to Teach Wicked Problem Re-Solution Skills in Sustainability Ethics” (with Tom Seager), The Bovay Seminar in History and Ethics of Engineering, Cornell University (5009).

56. “A Normative Research Agenda for Enhancing Translational Research in Medicine,” workshop on translational research medicine, University of Rochester (2009).

57. “Nudge: Phil Tech & STS Concerns,” guest lecture for graduate course, “Introduction to Science and Technology Studies,” Science and Technology Studies Department, Cornell University (2009).

58. “From Instrumentalism to Nudge: Should We Embrace Choice Architecture,” invited public lecture, Roskilde University, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009).

59.  “Integrative Engineering Education: Practical and Philosophical Lessons,” invited public lecture, Roskilde University, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009).

60. “The Ethical Design of Interfaces,” invited lecture for students enrolled in the Hum-Tech (Humanities-Technology) program at Roskilde University, Denmark (2009).

61. “Exploring Developmental and Pedagogical Dimensions of Interactional Expertise”  (with David Stone), 3rd annual Meeting of Studies of Expertise and Experience, Cardiff University, Wales (2009).

62. “Should the Public be ‘Nudged’?” (co-authored with and presented by Kyle Whyte), Eastern Division APA, Committee Session Symposium on Public Philosophy, New York (2009).

63. “Developing Reflexivity as an STS Program Director at the NSF: A Case Study in Interactional Expertise and Trading Zones,” Dept. Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University (2010).

64. “Technology, Tourism, and Ethics,” Dept. Philosophy, University of Twente, Netherlands (2010).

65. “Choice Architecture, Trust, and Competence,” Dept. Philosophy, University of Twente, Netherlands (2010).

66. “Using Games to Teach Sustainability Ethics,” Forum on Philosophy, Engineering, and Technology, Colorado School of Mines (2010).

67.  “Clarifying the Developmental and Psychological Dimensions of Interactional Expertise as a Function of Social and Psychological Relations Between Tacit and Explicit Knowledge” (with David Stone, Christopher Schunn, and Barbara Koslowski) at “Acquiring and Using Interactional Expertise: Psychological, Sociological, and Philosophical Perspectives” workshop, University of California at Berkeley (2010). [This became the 4th annual meeting of the Studies of Expertise and Experience.]

68. “Nudges: Ethical and Conceptual Issues,” Philosophy Club, Rochester Institute of Technology (2010).

69. “Interactional Expertise for Sustainability,” a poster co-authored with and presented by Andrew Berardy and Tom Seager, “Enhancing Communication in Cross-Disciplinary Research,” Coeur d’Alene, Idaho (2010).

70. “Towards a Pedagogy of Interactional Expertise for Sustainability Training” (with Andrew Berardy), 5th Annual Meeting of Studies of Expertise and Experience, Cardiff University, Wales (2011).

71. Attended workshop on “Imitation Game Training” at Cardiff University, Wales (2011).

72. “Improvisational Instruction in Experimental Ethics Education,” Sustainability Ethics Workshop, Troy, NY (2011).

73. “Nudging Public Health: Main Ideas and Ethical Concerns,” Collaborative Advocacy Network Meeting hosted by New York Health Works, Rochester, NY (2011).

74. “Creating a Game-Based Ethics Lab,” Postphenomenology and the Future of Philosophy of Technology, Stony Brook University (Manhattan Campus), March 23, 2012.

75. “Digital Games, Ethics, and the Occupy Wall Street Movement,” Digital Media Lecture Series at the Hall Center for Humanities, University of Kansas (2012).

76. “Nudging Expertise” (with Kyle Whyte). 6th Annual Meeting of Studies of Expertise and Experience, Cardiff University, Wales (2012).

77. Participated in “Testing for Interactional Expertise” post-symposium workshop, International Symposium for Sustainable Systems and Technologies (ISST), Boston, MA (2012).

78. Participated in “Sustainability Ethics” workshop, Boston, MA (2012).

79. “Should Google Nudge Expertise?” (with Kyle Whyte) annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and the Human Sciences, Rochester, NY (2012).

80. “The Obscurity Debate” DeVry University, online webinar (2013).

81. “TURINEX: A Social Science Tool to Help Understand and Predict Sustainable Consumption” (with Andrew Berardy, Thomas Seager, and Russell Uhl). Presented by Andrew Berardy. International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technologies (ISST), Cincinnati, OH (2013).

82. “Digital Etiquette” TEDx Flour City, Rochester, NY (2013).

83. Led discussion on the ethics of big data (with Kate Crawford) at the Microsoft Social Computing Symposium, NYU (2014).

84. Led interdisciplinary seminar, “Obscurity and Privacy,” University of Florida (2014).

85. “The Digital Age Challenge of Being a ‘Public Intellectual’” John Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, Notre Dame University (2014).

86. “Big Data Ethics: Lessons from UCLA’s Approach to Big Data Governance” (with Ken Wada) International Association of Privacy Professionals Global Privacy Summit, Washington, DC (2015).

87. “Two Ways for Privacy Professionals to Approach the Problem of ‘Creepy’ Technology” International Association of Privacy Professionals Global Privacy Summit, Washington, DC (2015).

88. “How to Stop Tech Companies from Ruining Our Relationships” The Holz Center for Science and Technology Studies, University of Madison, Madison, WI (2015).

89. “The Moral Dimension of Cyberservants”American Philosophical Association Pacific, Vancouver, Canada (2015).

90. Reply to Karen Levy and Tim Hwang, “The Presentation of the Machine in Everyday Life” We Robot Conference on Robotics, Law, and Policy, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle (2015).

91. Taught a three-day PhD course, which was also open to faculty, “Criticizing Contemporary Technology: From Drones to Google Glass and Self-Driving Cars,” Roskilde University, Denmark (2015).

92. Invited speaker for the “Potential Risks of Student Data Collection and Use” panel of the 2015 National Student Privacy Symposium, Washington, DC (2015).

93.  “Personal Information Out of Context: Building a Consumer Review Board” (with Jules Polonetsky), Make Data Work O’Reilly and Strata conference,  New York City (2015).

94. “Privacy and Security Non-Fiction Club,” Privacy and Security Forum, George Washington University, Washington, DC (2015).

95. “Privacy and the Internet of Things,” Privacy Roundtable, Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, CA (2015).

Technoscience “Roasts” Participated In (Organized by Don Ihde, Stony Brook University, 1998-2012)

  • Albert Borgmann
  • Hubert Dreyfus
  • Andrew Feenberg
  • Peter Galison
  • Donna Haraway
  • Andrew Pickering
  • Trevor Pinch
  • Peter-Paul Verbeek
  • Don Ihde

REVIEWER For:
1. Brookhaven National Laboratories Contest in Science Writing
2  Oxford University Press
3. SUNY Press
4. University of Chicago Press
5. Roman & Littlefield
6. Indiana University Press
7. Ashgate Publishing Group
8. Kluwer
9. Palgrave Macmillan
10. Columbia University Press
11. Wiley-Blackwell
12. Continental Philosophy Review
13. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences
14. Science, Technology, and Human Values
15. Janus Head
16. Synthese
17. Synthese Library
18. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science
19. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology
20. Peace and Change
21. Science and Engineering Ethics
22. Philosophical Psychology
23. Perspectives on Global Development and Technology
24. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space
25. Agricultural and Environmental Ethics
26. Agriculture and Human Values
27. Science as Culture
28. Theoria
29. Social Studies of Science
30. Journal of Applied Philosophy
31. British Journal of Sociology
32. National Endowment for the Humanities
33. National Science Foundation
34. IEEE Symposium on Technology and Society
35. Philosophia Scientiae
36. Routledge
37. European Journal of Risk Regulation
38. American Psychology-Law Society’s Early Career Professional Grant-In Aid program

TENURE AND PROMOTIONS REFEREE For:
1. The University of Tasmania

INVITED PANELIST
1. Cyborg Identities. University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark (1999).

2. Cultures of Death and Dying. Humanities Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (1999).

3. Excellence in Teaching. The Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching and The Council of Distinguished Teaching Professors. Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (2001).

SUMMER PROGRAMS
1. Participant at the 22nd annual Collegium Phaenomenologicum on “Spacing Art: Visibility, Image, Representation,” Perugia, Italy (1997).

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Graduate Courses Taught

  • Philosophy of Vision and Imaging
  • Sustainability Ethics

Undergraduate Courses Taught

  • Composition
  • Concepts of the Person
  • Heidegger’s Philosophy of Technology
  • Honors: Design Research
  • Introduction to Ethics
  • Introduction to Logic
  • Law, Technology, Privacy
  • Moral Reasoning
  • Minds and Machines
  • Political Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Expertise
  • Philosophy of Perception
  • Philosophy of Science
  • Philosophy of Peace
  • Philosophy of Technology
  • Philosophy of Vision and Imaging
  • Social Dimensions of Science
  • Sustainability Ethics
  • Technology and Human Values
  • Technology and Freedom
  • Thinking About Science
  • Western Literature

 Teaching Done In Special Academic Programs

  •   Women In Science and Engineering
  •   Learning Communities

Undergrad Theses Advised at RIT

  • Jathan Sadowski, “Experimental Analysis of the Gap Between Moral Beliefs and Moral Actions” (2011-2012 defense).
  • James Brown, “A Meta-Ethical Analysis of H5N1 Discourse” (2012 defense).
  • Thomas Bojarski, “Samantha’s Dilemma: A Look into a Life with Artificial Intelligence” (2014 defense)

Independent Studies Directed At RIT

  • Philosophy of Artificial Life
  • Technology and the Literature of Change
  • Modeling Prejudice Reduction I
  • Modeling Prejudice Reduction II
  • Philosophy of Identity
  • Philosophical Analysis of the “Culture Based Approach” to Design and Product Development
  • An Experiential Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics
  • The Ethics of Sustainability
  • Search Engine Regulation

NSF Research Assistantships Supervised at RIT

  • Jathan Sadowski (Winter 2010-Winter 2011-2012)

Co-Ops Supervised at RIT

  • Daniel Whiddon (40 hours per week during winter 2009-2010 quarter; with Tom Seager and David Schwartz)

Course Grader

  • Medicine and Society

Teaching Assistant

  • Law and Justice
  • Values in the Modern World
  • Philosophy of Religion

SERVICE AND PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

1. Philosophy Department Masters Student Representative, University of Memphis (1997-1998)

2. Academic Advisor for a cohort of the Communities of Science Program, Learning Communities, Stony Brook University (2002-2003)

3. Hiring Committee for Department of Philosophy, RIT (2003)

4. College Writing Committee, RIT (2004-2008)

5. Honors Committee, RIT (2004-2009)

6. Advisor Peace Studies Concentration, RIT (2004-2009)

7. Academic Standards Committee, RIT (2005-2006)

8. Philosophy Department Speaker Coordinator, RIT (2006-2009)

9. Mentor in Global Leadership Program, RIT (2008)

10. Curriculum Committee for the Golisano Institute of Sustainability, RIT (2008-2009)

11. Planning Committee for the Humanities/Science-Technology Cluster, a Mellon Foundation Funded Consortium between Syracuse University, Cornell University, and University of Rochester (2008-2010)

12. Tenure Committee, College of Liberal Arts, RIT (2010-2012)

13. Promotions Committee, College of Liberal Arts, RIT (2010-2012)

14. Philosophy Department Committee on Research Assistants, Graders, and Teaching Assistants (2011)

15. Program Committee for Undergraduate Summer Research Conference (responsible for Social Science and Humanities participants) (2012)

16. Third Year Review Committee, College of Liberal Arts, RIT (2012-2014)

PROFESSIONAL AND SCHOLARLY ASSOCIATIONS

  • American Philosophical Association
  • International Society for Hermeneutics and Science
  • Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy
  • Society for the Social Studies of Science
  • International Society for Artificial Life

LANGUAGES

  • German (reading)